Recent Posts

17 Years of Service

3/21/2019 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of West Fort Bend County first opened its doors in 2002. For over 17 years, it has been our pleasure to serve all of the cleanup and restoration needs of the Park Cities area. Throughout the years, both our professionals and services have grown in their expertise and knowledge. Our employees are certified experts in all realms of the restoration world, you couldn't ask for a better team when it comes to the care of your home or commercial property. Our services now span from water and fire restoration to biohazard cleanups and air duct cleanings. We are ready, at a moments notice, to help the community in a variety of ways with an amazing team of highly trained professionals. To better understand the range of ways SERVPRO can serve you, check out our list of services:

Restoration Services

Fire, Smoke & Soot

Water Removal

Dehumidification

Catastrophic Storm Response

Move Outs

Contents Restoration

Electronics and Equipment

Document Drying

Contents Claim Inventory Service

Cleaning Services

Air Ducts & HVAC

Biohazard, Crime Scene & Vandalism

Carpet & Upholstery

Drapes & Blinds

Ceilings, Walls & Hard Floors

Deodorization

Spring Cleaning Tips

3/14/2019 (Permalink)

Spring has officially sprung and that means it is time for spring cleaning! If you think the only way to clean your home is with harsh chemicals, think again! You can clean almost every surface in your home with distilled white vinegar. Get every room in your home looking clean and smelling fresh by following these spring cleaning tips.

Clean Carpet

Over the course of the winter, your carpet may have developed an odor and it may have sand, salt, and dirt trapped inside of it. Help eliminate the odor and remove anything trapped inside of the carpet by mixing essential oils and distilled white vinegar. Before applying this mixture, test it out on a small area of your carpet because some fabrics are sensitive and it may cause damage.

Clean Windows

Over time, windows get dirty or develop smudges. You can make your windows look crystal clear by mixing one part hot water and one part distilled white vinegar in a spray bottle. Simply spray the solution on the window and wipe away to clean.

Follow these three steps to make your windows truly shine.

  1. Clean from the top down.
  2. Do NOT clean your windows in direct sunlight. This will cause streaking.
  3. Avoid damage to your window frames by drying immediately.

Clean Mattress

Dust mites and odors are inevitable when it comes to mattresses. You can help eliminate them by doing the following steps.

  1. Remove all sheets and blankets from the bed.
  2. Spray mattress with distilled white vinegar.
  3. Sprinkle baking soda over the white vinegar and let it bubble.
  4. Place a towel over mattress for 1-2 hours or until dry.
  5. Vacuum up any residue from the baking soda.

Clean Refrigerator

You probably want to avoid using harsh chemicals where you store your food. Follow these steps to get your refrigerator looking like new!

  1. Remove all contents from the refrigerator.
  2. Wash shelves and the sides of the refrigerator with one part hot water and one part distilled white vinegar.
  3. Dry all areas of the refrigerator
  4. Wipe down jars before putting them back in the refrigerator.

Clean Bathtub

Over the course of time, your tub can build up with grime and soap residue. You can eliminate the buildup with ease by doing the following.

  1. Fill a spray bottle with one part hot water and one part distilled white vinegar
  2. Spray mixture in the tub and let it sit for 15 minutes.
  3. Wipe clean with a sponge or a towel
  4. Rise tub with water and wipe again 

Bio hazard Cleanup

3/14/2019 (Permalink)

Biohazard Bio hazard Cleanup Call SERVPRO of West Fort Bend County at 281-342-5326

The death of a loved one is a devastating event for family and friends. When a person dies in the home or at a business, the cleanup afterward can prove too traumatic for family to perform. Outdoor scenes of death are often cleaned by a fire department, but if someone has died inside a building cleanup needs can be extensive. Odor, blood spills and tissue remains may need to be removed. Specific procedures should be followed to ensure permanent remediation, allowing dignified closure of a painful chapter. 

Warnings

  • Always confirm professional cleanup services are certified or licensed in accordance with your state regulations for death-related cleanup projects.

    Instructions included in this article are intended as general guidelines and do not constitute training or certification in biohazard cleanup or removal.

     

    Always wear OSHA-compliant protective gear when cleaning up biohazardous materials, including blood, brain matter, feces, vomit, and decomposition seepage.

Flood Indoor Air Quality

3/13/2019 (Permalink)

Flood Cleanup to Protect Indoor Air Quality

During a flood cleanup, the indoor air quality in your home or office may appear to be the least of your problems. However, failure to remove contaminated materials and to reduce moisture and humidity can present serious long-term health risks. Standing water and wet materials are a breeding ground for microorganisms, such as viruses, bacteria and mold. They can cause disease, trigger allergic reactions and continue to damage materials long after the flood.

Replacing Your Flooring after a Flood

If you are repairing your home or building after a flood or hurricane, to prevent mold growth you should be sure your foundation is dry before you replace the flooring. The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) issued a standard which describes an easy way to check if your concrete slab is dry enough to replace the flooring. The basic approach is to fasten the edges of a clear piece of plastic sheeting to a concrete slab, and wait for approximately 16 hours. If moisture is visible on the plastic sheeting, it is still too wet to replace the flooring.

Hoarding, We Can Help

3/13/2019 (Permalink)

Each hoarding situation is different:

The way they started hoarding, the items they collect, the reasoning behind it, the conditions it is in.

Because each situation is different we handle each case on a case by case scenario. A hoarder home is one of the most difficult types of jobs to handle. Not only do we need to make sure that the contents are packed and boxed in order for us to do our job (handle the water damage/fire) but we also have to be mindful that these contents more than likely holds significant value to our customer.

How does one get into the situation where their home is completely full of contents and they are to the extreme buried alive?

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Hoarding is the persistent difficulty discarding or parting with possessions, regardless of their actual value. The behavior usually has deleterious effects—emotional, physical, social, financial, and even legal—for a hoarder and family members.

For those who hoard, the quantity of their collected items sets them apart from other people. Commonly hoarded items may be newspapers, magazines, paper and plastic bags, cardboard boxes, photographs, household supplies, food, and clothing.

 Hoarding can be related to compulsive buying (such as never passing up a bargain), the compulsive acquisition of free items (such as collecting flyers), or the compulsive search for perfect or unique items (which may not appear to others as unique, such as an old container).

SYMPTOMS AND BEHAVIOR

Someone who hoards may exhibit the following:

  • Inability to throw away possessions
  • Severe anxiety when attempting to discard items
  • Great difficulty categorizing or organizing possessions
  • Indecision about what to keep or where to put things
  • Distress, such as feeling overwhelmed or embarrassed by possessions
  • Suspicion of other people touching items
  • Obsessive thoughts and actions: fear of running out of an item or of needing it in the future; checking the trash for accidentally discarded objects
  • Functional impairments, including loss of living space, social isolation, family or marital discord, financial difficulties, health hazards

Cleaning Commercial Buildings

3/12/2019 (Permalink)

Cleaning Cleaning Commercial Buildings Call SERVPRO of West Fort Bend County at 281-342-5326

Cleaning Flooded Buildings:

This Fact Sheet was developed to help building owners, operators, contractors, and volunteer assistance groups deal with the challenges of working in structures that were not fully cleaned and dried shortly after the flooding. Remember that when first returning to a flood-damaged building, responders should follow the initial precautions and restoration steps detailed in the FEMA Recovery Advisory, The ABC’s of Returning to Flooded Buildings (Appendix E of FEMA 549, 2005). When a flooded home has not been cleaned and dried within a few weeks of the flood event, mold contamination should be expected, and specific steps are needed to clean and restore the home. Basic cleaning and drying information is presented in the FEMA Recovery Advisory Initial Restoration for Flooded Buildings (FEMA 549, 2005), which specifies five steps for post-flood building restoration, including (1) air out, (2) move out, (3) tear out, (4) clean out, and (5) dry out. This Fact Sheet builds on the last two of these steps and assumes that the majority of the muck-out and gutting process has been completed and the home is ready for cleaning and drying.

Key Issues

• Floodwaters carry a variety of contaminants such as bacteria, oil, heavy metals, and pesticides. While first responders’ initial evaluations of Hurricane Sandy floodwaters indicated that exposure to such items are below current limits for safe occupancy, proper cleaning and preparation for rebuilding is critical to protect workers and occupants from both short-term hazards and long-term risk.

• Other hazards are present in addition to the substances brought in with the floodwaters, especially in homes that were not dried out within a week of the flooding. Safety issues related to wet mechanical and electrical systems, exposure to lead and asbestos released from building materials, and mold growth need to be addressed.

• Mold is a serious health hazard if the home is reoccupied without proper cleaning. Although a variety of products and techniques can reduce and control mold, the cleaning and drying process described in this Fact Sheet also helps to remove other floodwater contaminants.

Personal Safety

Flooded buildings can pose a number of health and safety risks, for both individuals who wish to maintain occupancy and those who work to repair them. Eliminating hazards is the best way to protect occupants and workers; however, until conditions can be returned to normal, anyone working in a flooded building should use appropriate personal safety equipment and take appropriate safety precautions.

Follow Us!

3/11/2019 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of West Fort Bend County is officially apart of the social media world. We are trying to enhance our ability to help anyone who needs it.  With multiple social media pages it allows the customer to access our services more easily.  This also enable the customer to get a better feel for who we are as a company and who each of our employees are as people.  Please check us out at any of our social media pages for a better look at SERVPRO of West Fort Bend County and the occasional DIY for home improvements.

Twitter:  SERVPRO Of West Fort Bend County

Facebook:  SERVPRO of West Fort Bend County

Instagram:  SERVPRO of West Fort Bend County  

Do's and Don'ts of Disaster Cleanup

3/11/2019 (Permalink)

Fires and Floods: Dos and Don’ts of Disaster Cleanup

There’s a lot of things you plan to do in the event of a flood, fire, or other disaster. Hopefully you’ll never have to do them.

But what do you do once the unthinkable happens? You probably already have an emergency plan in place for when a disaster is approaching, or even happening at that moment. But what about when it’s over? How on earth are you supposed to get back on your feet after a fire or flood has damaged or destroyed your home? Well, the good news is we can help you rebuild your world. Here are some tips on disaster cleanup from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, The American Red Cross, and Aer Industries, a company that deals with professional disaster restoration.

First, be safe.

If you must evacuate your home, don’t reenter it until a fire or other local official has given the OK. If your home was severely damaged, wait for a contractor to evaluate it and, if necessary, shore up damaged areas before you return.

“Water or fire damage in a building can cause more than surface-deep damage,” said the Aer Industries team, in an e-mail.

After a fire, the fire department should ensure utilities are safe to use or disconnected. Don’t reconnect utilities, FEMA recommended. Standing water and electricity is a bad combination, so make sure the power’s off before you enter a flooded area.

3 Subdued Potential Problems

3/8/2019 (Permalink)

Why SERVPRO 3 Subdued Potential Problems Call SERVPRO of West Fort Bend County at 281-342-5326

To be successful in business, you must stay on top of the competition. You must also plan for potential catastrophes. Few things can destroy a business faster than a fire. As such, you must carry comprehensive property insurance to protect your business from fire loss. Not all commercial fires are a total loss, though. If your business has sustained partial loss in a fire, you must watch for three potential problems.

  1. Insufficient Cleaning

While flames are usually destructive, they may not be your biggest nightmare. On the contrary, smoke damage may affect all parts of your business. Even worse, fire-containment measures can dirty or destroy parts of your building that flames never touched. Fortunately, a qualified fire restoration service can likely return your business to its pre-fire condition. When planning repairs after a partial-loss fire, be sure you work with a reputable firm to sufficiently clean the structure.

  1. Unseen Damage

Fires have a way of damaging all parts of a building. That is, fire loss can be hidden deep within the walls, ductwork or foundation. When assessing damage, be sure to consider the following:

Smoke

Soot

Air quality

Mold

Fire remediators have the experience, skill and equipment to completely analyze your fire-restoration needs. Rather than assuming untouched parts of the building are free from damage, request a comprehensive analysis.

Did You Know About Lead?

3/8/2019 (Permalink)

Lead paint and lead poisoning as it pertains to old houses, have long been a lightening rod of controversy. Some people fear old homes of having lead paint and have difficulty buying them. Lead paint may not be the national health concern you've been told. For children and pregnant women, even the smallest amount of lead can be dangerous. Recent EPA, CDC rules and regulations concerning lead paint are completely unwanted and accomplish nothing , but increased cost for home owners. If your home was built before 1978,  there is a good chance it has lead base paint. SERVPRO of West Fort Bend County is very careful to follow the complex array of rules laid out in the Era's renovation, repair and painting act or (RRP), that went into effect in April 2010. Determine if your family is at risk for lead poisoning with the lead poisoning checklist. Be aware that a older home is more likely to have lead paint.